A Carnival in the Sky – The New Indian Express

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By Express press service

CHENNAI: Before the 70km journey from Chennai to Mahabalipuram, the kite festival was just an idea for me, a few colorful kites flying high and kids enjoying the view. Little did I know it would be anything like I ever imagined. The first Tamil Nadu International Kite Festival (TNIK) from August 13-15, organized by Global Media Box in association with the state tourism department, was a conglomeration of people from different parts of the world displaying their passion resulting in a colorful wave of patterns. and pictures on the blue sky. Benedict Savio, founder of Global Media Box, said:

“The project was to organize a family carnival with inflatable show kites, not combat kites. We found the best teams from four countries – India, Malaysia, Thailand and USA to fly their kites.

Varieties exhibited
Around 100 kites were on display among the six Indian teams and four foreign teams. K Srinivas of the Hyderabad team representing the Kohinoor Kite Club described his collection of kites as “those that represent history, technology and innovation”. Proud of India, they presented kites by Bhagat Singh and Swami Vivekananda. His collection also included LEDs, Trilobites (a small version of Megabite, the largest kite), spinners and ring kites.

Digant Joshi from Vadodara Kite Club, Gujarat, left the kids speechless with his long list of cartoon characters in the sky Chhota Bheem, Dholu, Bholu, Chutki and Bal Ganesh. The highlight of his collection, however, was Harry Potter’s map of Hogwarts, painted on a flat kite designed by his daughter and architect, Pavani Joshi. He also exhibited his model rocket created by his own company Aerosports Association. With a total collection of 17 kites, he has done wonders in the sky.

While most kite flyers designed their kites, they didn’t forget to think about the art and culture of where they came from. Shriniketh Rao representing the Mangalore team brought traditional kites from South India which include Kathakali and Pushpaka Vimana symbols. “We are inspired by Hindu mythology. Kites depicting characters like Vibhishana, Gajaraja and Garuda will also impart knowledge about our culture to everyone who comes to visit the festival,” he said.

Sandesh Kaddi High Flyers Belgaum also strongly believes in representing art through kites. He specializes in flying kites of different geometric shapes rooted in the Chittara folk painting of Karnataka. Apart from that, it also exhibited lion, tiger and Mario cartoon character puffy kites for kids.

Bringing the fun of a foreign country, kites from other countries were colorful unions of birds, dolphins, dragons and geckos. Mal Brooks from the USA, who has been flying kites for over 20 years, shared that since his only intention is to make people smile wherever they see his kites, his kites have no special meaning. He and his wife Pirawan from Thailand splashed warm colors against the clear sky with their trilobites.

behind the wonders
From Ashok Shah who made kites from scratch to compete in international festivals representing India, to Mal Brooks who travels the world collecting kites, kites have bonded through their mutual love for kites. Sharing the challenges they faced at the start of their journey with the kite, Ashok said, “Previously, India had no sophisticated kites other than fighter kites. It was even difficult for us to research how to make inflatable kites because there were no materials available. After studying the basics using Indian and imported books, learning from other kite makers, experimenting a lot and trying materials ranging from paper to nylon, we have now succeeded in creating the best kites in the world.

The kites are made from ripstop nylon, a similar material used for parachutes, which Ashok says is easy to cut and sew. Additional materials like fiberglass rod, carbon rod or bamboo are preferred for support as they are lightweight and durable. With a height ranging from 1 foot to 200 feet, these kites cost from Rs 25,000 to Rs 5 lakh. “Costs are high because we only use high-tech equipment. When we merge different kites, the price can even go up to 80 lakh. Since people use these types of kites the most, we don’t mind spending money to organize the best experience,” he shared, pointing to the horizontally arranged vibrating kites. .

At the end of the day, Benedict summed up: “Witnessing the huge rush of registrations, we hope to organize the event next year as a 10-day carnival with even more kites.”

A creative way to thank
To thank the government of Tamil Nadu and the people, Ashok Shah of Maharashtra of Fly 360 has personalized the kite of the poet Thiruvalluvar. He also brought his collections of flat, mini, 3D, ton, four line, inflatable and ring kites. The event which had seen more than 5,000 registrations will return next year with even more fun.

CHENNAI: Before the 70km journey from Chennai to Mahabalipuram, the kite festival was just an idea for me, a few colorful kites flying high and kids enjoying the view. Little did I know it would be anything like I ever imagined. The first Tamil Nadu International Kite Festival (TNIK) from August 13-15, organized by Global Media Box in association with the state tourism department, was a conglomeration of people from different parts of the world displaying their passion resulting in a colorful wave of patterns. and images on the blue sky. Benedict Savio, founder of Global Media Box, said: “The plan was to have a family carnival with inflatable kites, not fighter kites. We found the best teams from four countries – India, Malaysia, Thailand and USA to fly their kites. Varieties on display About 100 kites were on display from the six Indian teams and four foreign teams. K Srinivas of the Hyderabad team representing the Kohinoor Kite Club described his collection of kites as “those that represent history, technology and innovation”. Proud of India, they presented kites by Bhagat Singh and Swami Vivekananda. His collection also included LEDs, Trilobites (a small version of Megabite, the largest kite), spinners and ring kites. Digant Joshi from Vadodara Kite Club, Gujarat, left the kids speechless with his long list of cartoon characters in the sky Chhota Bheem, Dholu, Bholu, Chutki and Bal Ganesh. The highlight of his collection, however, was Harry Potter’s map of Hogwarts, painted on a flat kite designed by his daughter and architect, Pavani Joshi. He also exhibited his model rocket created by his own company Aerosports Association. With a total collection of 17 kites, he has done wonders in the sky. While most kite flyers designed their kites, they didn’t forget to think about the art and culture of where they came from. Shriniketh Rao representing the Mangalore team brought traditional kites from South India which include Kathakali and Pushpaka Vimana symbols. “We are inspired by Hindu mythology. Kites depicting characters like Vibhishana, Gajaraja and Garuda will also impart knowledge about our culture to everyone who comes to visit the festival,” he said. Sandesh Kaddi High Flyers Belgaum also strongly believes in representing art through kites. He specializes in flying kites of different geometric shapes rooted in the Chittara folk painting of Karnataka. Apart from that, it also exhibited lion, tiger and Mario cartoon character puffy kites for kids. Bringing the fun of a foreign country, kites from other countries were colorful unions of birds, dolphins, dragons and geckos. Mal Brooks from the USA, who has been flying kites for over 20 years, shared that since his only intention is to make people smile wherever they see his kites, his kites have no special meaning. He and his wife Pirawan from Thailand splashed warm colors against the clear sky with their trilobites. Behind the wonders From Ashok Shah who has made kites from scratch to compete in international festivals representing India to Mal Brooks who travels the world to collect kites, kites have bonded by their mutual love for kites. Sharing the challenges they faced at the start of their journey with the kite, Ashok said, “Previously, India had no sophisticated kites other than fighter kites. It was even difficult for us to research how to make inflatable kites because there were no materials available. After studying the basics using Indian and imported books, learning from other kite makers, experimenting a lot and trying materials ranging from paper to nylon, we have now succeeded in creating the best kites in the world. The kites are made from ripstop nylon, a similar material used for parachutes, which Ashok says is easy to cut and sew. Additional materials like fiberglass rod, carbon rod or bamboo are preferred for support as they are lightweight and durable. With a height ranging from 1 foot to 200 feet, these kites cost from Rs 25,000 to Rs 5 lakh. “Costs are high because we only use high-tech equipment. When we merge different kites, the price can even go up to 80 lakh. Since people use these types of kites the most, we don’t mind spending money to organize the best experience,” he shared, pointing to the horizontally arranged vibrating kites. . At the end of the day, Benedict summed up: “Witnessing the huge rush of registrations, we hope to organize the event next year as a 10-day carnival with even more kites.” A creative way to give thanks To give thanks to the government of Tamil Nadu and the people, Ashok Shah of Maharashtra of Fly 360 has personalized the kite of poet Thiruvalluvar. He also brought his collections of flat, mini, 3D, ton, four line, inflatable and ring kites. The event, which had recorded more than 5,000 registrations, will return next year with even more pleasure.

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